This is Your Brain on Joy

Finally. That was my first response to Dr. Earl Henslin’s book This is Your Brain on Joy. Finally, a psychologist who recognizes the spiritually of a person. Finally, a Christian who understands the physical aspects of mental illness.

Dr. Henslin explains how the brain works and how each area of the brain affects each person. In addition, he shows that mental disorders such as anxiety disorder, attention deficit disorder, or depression are not character flaws or sinful behavior, but real biological based disease.
person jumping with joy

Working with renowned physician Dr. Daniel Amen, Dr. Henslin learned of groundbreaking research done with SPECT scans (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). These scans show more detail of the brain working than any other to date. Specific regions of the brain control specific actions and emotions. Dr. Henslin, using Dr. Amen’s work, gives clear details of these actions.

Going further, Dr. Henslin gives suggestions for self-help that includes not just the typical think good thoughts and get plenty of exercise, but dietary changes, helpful music, and spiritual changes. Dr. Henslin clearly writes from a Christian perspective, but he doesn’t promote one faith over another.

I was particularly encouraged by Dr. Henslin taking on Christian ministries that dismiss depression and other mental illnesses as lack of faith or other spiritual needs.  He pulls no punches that mental disorders are a biological based, not faith-based.

I find the explanations of the parts of the brain and how they function childish. Readers, even if they can’t pronounce the medical names, can understand the biological explanations without being told there’s a gerbil in the brain.

It’s disappointing that the small photos of the SPECT scans are not clear. Most are too dark to even view. I encourage the reader to go to www.amenclinics.com to see living color scans for the true impact.

This is Your Brain on Joy is a must read for anyone dealing with mental illness either as someone with a diagnosis or a family member. Like all psychology books, do be careful that you don’t finish with every disease mentioned.

 

This Is Your Brain on Joy
by Dr. Earl Henslin
ISBN978-0785298373
Paperback – $11.26
Kindle – $6.99

 

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11 thoughts on “This is Your Brain on Joy

  1. Susan-
    Enjoyed the Your Brain on Joy review. The book is extremely similar in scope to mine, although not sure how much humor is interwoven in the “Joy” book. I went to Amazon for more info and found the co-author’s blog. Cool beans!

  2. I was particularly encouraged by Dr. Henslin taking on Christian ministries that dismiss depression and other mental illnesses as lack of faith or other spiritual needs. He pulls no punches that mental disorders are a biological based, not faith based.

  3. I chose to review this book because I was attracted by the title, This Is Your Brain on Joy. It reminded me of the award-winning TV commercial: “This is your brain. This is your brain on drugs. Any questions?” In addition, who isn’t attracted to the word “joy?”

  4. The cover and the title seem quite unfortunate for the content. With the title and the pretty flowers in the shape of a brain, I was expecting to read about a happy, fluffy book. Quite the opposite it seems. I might buy this.

  5. I think you’d find it really interesting and informative with lots of good implications for pastoral counseling. I just told a couple we have in our church who are having some fairly normal marriage struggles to add the Omega-3 fats to their diets because of all the benefits of which many I think in time will help with their realtionship issues. I hope I wasn’t going to far but this book help me think about how to be sure the basics are covered before we go into the deeper issues. Does that make sense?

  6. It’s good to read more enlightened thoughts on these issues. Of course depression is a chemical/physical thing, and some people are more prediposed to depression because of this fact.

  7. Yes at last someone recognises depression and anxiety often have physical origins in the brain. Some people are more predisposed to depression because of the physical composition of their brain.

  8. Dr. Henslin gives suggestions for self-help that includes not just the typical think good thoughts and get plenty of exercise, but dietary changes, helpful music, and spiritual changes. Dr. Henslin clearly writes from a Christian perspective, but he doesn’t promote one faith over another.

  9. I am someone who struggles with anxiety and OCD, and I have a family history of mental illness. I am also tired of simplistic or dismissive responses from Christians. This sounds like it would be a good book to read. I may have to order it from Amazon.

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