woman relaxing with book and coffee

Coping: Self-Care

One of my first questions when our son was returning home after a suicide attempt was, “How do we ‘watch’’ him?” I didn’t get the answer I wanted: “You don’t.”

I was prepared to have a 24-hour watch, and do it all myself if I had to. That was neither possible nor practical. In the emotion of the moment, I wasn’t thinking; I was reacting. I didn’t, couldn’t, think about myself.

Stages of Dealing: Anxiety

Many family members get stuck in the Denial Stage, never moving on to really dealing with the mental illness of their loved one. Leaving Denial means believing this terrible thing has really happened. While in the Denial Stage, it is easier to think all the bad symptoms will magically go away, or there’s some other

Coping with the Holidays

Holidays are hard. Crowded schedules, family expectations, self expectations, and physical and emotional drain. For our loved ones who suffer with brain disorders that cause emotional distress, all the stress of the holidays is even worse. While we are planning joyous celebrations, our ill family member may be just trying to deal with the daily